Join Arden’s free virtual studio to get member-only tips, tools and singing insights

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BRAVO

I’m so excited to have you!

Studio Members get motivational emails every once in a while, first dibs on scholarship seats to singing workshops and master-classes and other studio member-only resources I don’t offer anywhere else.

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Join Arden’s free virtual studio to get member-only tips, tools and singing insights

IMG_9257-Edit

BRAVO

I’m so excited to have you!

Studio Members get motivational emails every once in a while, first dibs on scholarship seats to singing workshops and master-classes and other studio member-only resources I don’t offer anywhere else.

Please enter your name.
Please enter a valid email address.
Something went wrong. Please check your entries and try again.
Frustrated singer, improve singing, singing techniques, voice teacher los angeles

Why You Are Frustrated With Your Singing Technique (And How To Change That)

You are a dedicated singer who has spent years honing good singing technique to improve your voice, but you are frustrated because even with all that training, you are still not singing to your full potential. I’ve been there! There’s a really good reason you are frustrated and one really solid way to change that.  When I was younger, my parents’ bathroom was the site of all my Grammy award winning performances – specifically the shower in that bathroom. Man, I was unstoppable in that shower! I could hit notes in there that were full and sustained like nobody’s business. I remember being so frustrated that nothing ever sounded or felt as good as the songs I sang in that shower. Now, with years of awareness around how the mind / body connection works in singing, I totally understand why singing was easier in that shower. Most people think it’s because the acoustics in the shower are better, but there’s actually another, more powerful reason. When you are in the shower you sing like you just don’t care. Nobody is watching or listening. There is nothing at stake, so you don’t care and you let go. Sound energy responds to

One Easy Tip To Improve Your Singing With A Simple Yoga Pose

Awareness plays a huge part in learning how to improve your singing. Before you say “Oh Arden, you’re jumping on the awareness bandwagon too??” let me admit to already being a full fledged rider of that bandwagon for many reasons, not the least of which is that awareness is the number one tool I use as a singer and teacher to inspire the biggest improvements in singing technique for myself and my students. In my own life lately, this awareness has expanded in a very cool way and I’m excited to share it with you here. I find myself completely aware of how things that seem to have nothing to do with how to improve singing, actually have everything to do with how to improve singing! My latest epiphany occurred in yoga the other day. As many of you know, I’m a devoted yogi. One of the basic poses in yoga is called Tadasana, or Mountain Pose. Tadasana is the foundation for all standing poses in yoga. The basic structure of Tadasana consists of standing with your feet together and your arms by your side with your palms open facing out – nothing more then that. The other day I

Arden Kaywin, voice teacher los angeles, offers a checklist to get rid of tension while singing

A Simple Physical Awareness Checklist To Improve Your Singing

The ways in which we use our bodies in our day-to-day lives effects how we sound when we sing. What do I mean exactly? When your body is your instrument, the way you use it when you are not singing influences how it behaves when you are. An example I like to give is of a tenor I worked with who was extremely tall (nearly NBA tall, well over six feet). He had always been taller then everyone around him from the time he was young. Because of his height, his interactions with other people nearly always required him to look down at the people he was speaking to, round his shoulders, cock his head and neck downwards both to try to make eye contact, and to also make himself appear smaller and less imposing to those he was with. When he would get up to sing, the same physical pattern would appear. . . a physical shortening and collapsing. Singing from this position created tension in his neck, throat and sternum which prevented him from accessing the full breadth and energy of his support, limited his range and squeezed his sound. Yet he didn’t even realize it because that